Neutering

Neutering Your Pet

 Neutering is strongly advised unless you are planning on breeding from your pet, this is to:

  • Prevent unplanned, unwanted and costly offspring

  • Reduce risk of certain types of cancer and diseases

  • Possible reduction in aggression, straying, spraying and other anti-social behaviour

When can my pet be neutered?

Your pet can be neutered from 6 months old, however, each pet is an individual so discussing your and your pets specific needs with us is recommended.  

What will happen?

Males
This procedure is called a ‘castration’ during which the testicles and spermatic cord are removed. This stops your pet from producing sperm and therefore cannot father any offspring. Neutering males removes the risk of:

  • Testicular cancer

  • Reduces the risk of prostate problems.

Females
This procedure is called a ‘spay’ during which the ovaries and uterus are removed. This stops your pet from coming into season and are unable to become pregnant. Neutering females removes the risk of:

  • Phantom pregnancies

  • Pyometra – an infection of the uterus that can be fatal and requires emergency surgery.

  • Ovarian cancer

  • Reduces the risk of mammary (breast) cancer later on in life.

Please note:

  • Neutering does not cause weight gain – it does however lower your pets metabolic rate and with appropriate feeding your pet will not gain weight, for further information please contact the surgery.

  • Your pet does NOT NEED to have a litter before being neutered

Before the operation

Dogs and cats

On the evening before the operation, your pet must not eat after 7pm, but may drink water. If you forget, or suspect your pet may have eaten something please let a member of staff aware and it may be advised to reschedule the procedure. This is for the safety of your pet as an empty stomach reduces the risk of anaesthetic complications.  Please give your pet the opportunity to go to the toilet before coming in to the clinic.

Rabbits and guinea pigs

Rabbits and Guinea Pigs DO NOT need to be starved before their operation. Please bring some of your pet’s normal food with you to encourage them to eat once they are awake.